Category: Of Interest…

Items of interest to the Vaisnava’s C.A.R.E. community and readers.

Elder Abuse: Know the Signs

Elder Abuse: Know the Signs

When most people get older, they have to rely more on others to help take care of themselves. That brings a greater chance someone will mistreat them or take advantage of them. That’s called elder abuse. Elder abuse is when someone harms or neglects a person age 60 or older. It can happen to anyone.more>>

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Pishima – the sister of Srila Prabhupada.

Pishima – the sister of Srila Prabhupada.

By Ananga Manjari Dasi   At the last stages of Pishima’s (Prabhupada’s sister) life, I took it upon myself to care for her. She had deteriorated so much so that when I woke up one morning, I went around Prabhupada’s samadhi and I prayed, “What can I do for her? Take her because she onlymore>>

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A Balanced Approach to Coping With Life After Loss

A Balanced Approach to Coping With Life After Loss

  When coping with grief, it’s logical to prioritize managing the distressing thoughts and emotions that have become a part of your life since your loved one’s death. This makes sense for a number of reasons. Chief among them the fact that painful grief emotions stink. The need to focus specifically on the loss andmore>>

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Dr. Atul Gawande on the questions we should be asking in end-of-life care

Dr. Atul Gawande on the questions we should be asking in end-of-life care

Dr. Atul Gawande believes that caring for the dying shouldn’t be primarily about keeping people alive longer but about ensuring quality of life. “The goal is not a good death. The goal is a good life all the way ’til the very end,” Gawande told “CBS This Morning” on Wednesday. His book, “Being Mortal: Medicinemore>>

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The Gentler Symptoms of Dying

The Gentler Symptoms of Dying

By SARA MANNING PESKIN, M.D. The patient’s hair was styled with curls so stiff, they held her head a few inches up from her hospital pillow. She had painted her lips a shade of bright pink that exuded the confidence of age. Just after her colon burst, she was still awake. She looked around, atmore>>

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SIT, BE QUIET:  HOW TO SUPPORT THE DYING

SIT, BE QUIET:  HOW TO SUPPORT THE DYING

“I haven’t called you, because I just don’t know what to say.”  My (former) husband had finally caught up with his relative, who admitted that he had been avoiding calls and requests for support.  “I have never been in your situation.  Your wife is dying.  I don’t know what that’s like, so how could Imore>>

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“How We Die” By Sherwin B. Nuland, M.D. — Recommended Reading!

“How We Die” By Sherwin B. Nuland, M.D. — Recommended Reading!

Sherwin Nuland, M.D. on the Art of Dying and How Our Mortality Confers Meaning Upon Our Lives By Maria Popova “To lament that we shall not be alive a hundred years hence, is the same folly as to be sorry we were not alive a hundred years ago,” Montaigne wrote in his timeless meditation onmore>>

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How One Mom’s Extraordinary Love Transforms the Short Lives of Hospice Babies

How One Mom’s Extraordinary Love Transforms the Short Lives of Hospice Babies

By Cori Salchert TODAY Contributor  Cori Salchert calls the home she shares with her husband, Mark, a “house of hope.” A former perinatal bereavement nurse with eight biological children, Salchert began adopting what she calls “hospice babies” —babies with life-limiting or terminal diagnoses — in 2012. Salchert says these babies come from families who findmore>>

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Joan Didion on Grief — “The Year of Magical Thinking”

Joan Didion on Grief — “The Year of Magical Thinking”

“Grief, when it comes, is nothing like we expect it to be.” BY MARIA POPOVA “To lament that we shall not be alive a hundred years hence, is the same folly as to be sorry we were not alive a hundred years ago,” Montaigne wrote in his 16th-century essay on death and the art ofmore>>

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‘I know they are going to die.’ This foster father takes in only terminally ill children

‘I know they are going to die.’ This foster father takes in only terminally ill children

By: Hailey Branson-Potts  (Los Angeles Times)   The children were going to die. Mohamed Bzeek knew that. But in his more than two decades as a foster father, he took them in anyway — the sickest of the sick in Los Angeles County’s sprawling foster care system. He has buried about 10 children. Some died in hismore>>

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