Category: Care of the Caregiver

Helping Someone Who’s Grieving

Helping Someone Who’s Grieving

  What to Say and How to Comfort Others Through Bereavement, Grief, and Loss When someone you care about is grieving after a loss, it can be difficult to know what to say or do. You may be afraid of intruding, saying the wrong thing, or making your loved one feel even worse. Or maybemore>>

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7 Ways to Step Up Your Self-Care as You Age

7 Ways to Step Up Your Self-Care as You Age

 By Patricia Corrigan  How do you cope with aging? I’ve been thinking about that question since first exploring it two years ago on Next Avenue. This time, I was prompted to add to my list after a rather unusual conversation with my doctor. Below are seven of my self-care “do’s.” What are yours? 1. Get off the medicalmore>>

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5 Calming Techniques for Caregivers

5 Calming Techniques for Caregivers

When it Begins to Feel Like Too Much, Follow These Simple Tips: By Paula Spencer Scott (Editor’s note: This article originally appeared in Caring.com.) While being a caregiver for an elderly loved one can be deeply rewarding, it can also be extremely stressful. During those moments when your nerves are frayed and your patience is wearingmore>>

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The Quiet Blessing of Grief That Never Ends

The Quiet Blessing of Grief That Never Ends

By Jill Smolowe In the almost seven years since I laid my husband to rest, followed barely a year later by the loss of my sister and mother, I’ve developed an appreciation for just how unpredictable and, well, amazing grief can be. I’m not talking about the period of hollowing when the shock and fog ofmore>>

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Video for Caring Professionals

Video for Caring Professionals

Dear Caregivers, I often go to Grief.com to learn from grief counselor, David Kessler. Several years ago I attended his one-day workshop and learned much from his expertise.  I have read  several of his books and highly recommend them. Below is a short video with David giving six tips for professional caregivers which may help youmore>>

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15 Things Caregivers Should Know After a Loved One Has Had a Stroke

15 Things Caregivers Should Know After a Loved One Has Had a Stroke

It’s better to find out than miss out. Be aware of the medications that have been prescribed to your loved one and their side effects. Ask if your home should be modified to meet the specific needs of the stroke survivor. Ask a doctor, nurse or therapist to clarify any unanswered questions or to provide writtenmore>>

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Guilt and Regret in Prolonged Illness

Guilt and Regret in Prolonged Illness

By Kenneth J. Doka, PhD It often is said that sudden death is hard on survivors, but easy for the person who died. That same conventional wisdom may view death after a long illness as being easier for survivors. The truth is more complex. Each death is difficult— but in its own way. Sudden deathsmore>>

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“Who Am I Now That I Am Not A Caregiver?”

“Who Am I Now That I Am Not A Caregiver?”

For all of his eight years, Carolyn cared for her son Billy, a hydrocephalic child who was ventilator-dependent and had a seizure disorder. He also had a stomach tube, thyroid problems, and brittle bones. Developmentally, he remained at two or three years old. Carolyn was able to have 16 hours of nursing care each daymore>>

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Caregiverʼs Guide to Medications and Aging

Caregiverʼs Guide to Medications and Aging

Medications: A Double-Edged Sword “Any symptom in an elderly patient should be considered a drug side effect until proved otherwise.” Brown University Long-term Care Quality Letter, 1995 Modern medicines have contributed to longer life spans, improved health, and vastly improved our overall quality of life. Medications are the most common treatment for many diseases andmore>>

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Coping with Behavior Problems after Head Injury

Coping with Behavior Problems after Head Injury

Identifying Behavior Problems Head injury survivors may experience a range of neuro­psychological problems following a traumatic brain injury. Depending on the part of the brain affected and the severity of the injury, the result on any one individual can vary greatly. Personality changes, memory and judgement deficits, lack of impulse control, and poor concentration aremore>>

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